Dr. Ilizarov

Dr Ilizarov


Prof. Gavriil Abramovich Ilizarov was born on 15 June 1921 in RUSSIA. He graduated from Medical School in 1944. Without any practical training he was sent for war – TORN REGION OF KURGAN IN NORTH SIBERIA. There were thousands of wounded soldiers who had OSTEOMYELITIS and infected Non Unions of Long Bones.

In 1951 he developed a revolutionary technique and called it A RING FIXATOR. Originally bicycle parts were used for the frame of the fixator. Ilizarov found that the structures of wheels of the bicycle is like the cross-section of limbs, the axis like bones,  peripheral tire like soft tissue and skin that encased bone. If use the wheel principles to fix or treat limb fractures, no need for a complexed operation. So he made 2 wheels steel rings, connect them with 3-4 worm rod, a miniature form embryo of external fixation device was  produced. He uses this device and technology treat nonunion patients who couldn’t recovery before. Later he invented 600 kinds of external fixation device and therapy method, but all were on basis of wheel ring until today.

With this fixator he saved limbs and lives of many soldiers. Though he continued his work in small hospitals, He became very popular with his magic touch.

In 1967, famous Soviet Olympic Jumper, VALERY BRUMEL met with a motor cycle accident for which 14 surgeries failed to unite his bones. He ultimately was treated by Prof. Ilizarov Successfully and went back to perform again. This incident drove home the importance and efficiency of this new technique and brought recognition to Prof. Ilizarov.

  The USSR founded the ILIZAROV SCIENTIFIC CENTRE in 1971, today called as "THE ALL UNION CENTRE" The Ilizarov Method is today used throughout the world for limb lengthening, to correct deformities and to repair fractures believed to be UNTREATABLE.  

This novel technique was introduced to the West in the 1980s, predominantly via Italian surgeons. It gained popularity in the 90s, and has been used successfully by many surgeons throughout the world now.